Baltimore's Charles Center-Inner Harbor Timeline, 1950-2000

       
PHASE ONE — CHARLES CENTER
       
1952  

Report of the Commission on Governmental Efficiency and Economy: the City faces municipal bankruptcy if the downward trend is not reversed.

     
       
     
1954  

Closing of O'Neill's Department Store the day after Christmas: the business community forms the Committee for Downtown

     
       
     
1955  

Formation of the Greater Baltimore Committee, made up of the City's leading businesses, law firms, universities, hospitals, etc.

     
       
     
1956  

Creation of the Baltimore Urban Renewal and Housing Agency (BURHA) — the nation's first

     
         
       
1957  

The Committee for Downtown contracts with the Planning Council of the GBC for a $225,000 Master Plan for the Central Business District (CBD)

The Charles Center Project is identified as the first phase of the CBD Master Plan

     
       
     
1958  

The Charles Center Plan is donated to the City by the Committee for Downtown and the Greater Baltimore Committee, and endorsed by Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro, Jr.

A $25 million municipal bond issue is approved by the voters for Charles Center

     
       
     
1960  

One Charles Center, designed by Mies Van der Rohe, wins the competition for the rights to build the first building in Charles Center

     
         
     
1961  

Announcement of the construction of the Blaustein Building on the former site of the Hub Department Store

     
       
     
1962  

Hilton Hotels Corporation announces its commitment to develop the first new hotel in Charles Center

     
       
     
1963  

The corner of Charles and Baltimore Streets is designated as the site of the new Morris Mechanic Theater, replacing the condemned old Ford’s Theater

Nine new buildings have been constructed or committed in the Charles Center Project

     
         
        PHASE TWO — THE ORIGINAL INNER HARBOR MASTER PLAN: Playground for Baltimoreans
       
       
1963  

Theodore R. McKeldin becomes Mayor for the second time and announces the City will move on to redevelop the entire 300-acre Inner Harbor Area

     
       
     
1964  

The Inner Harbor Master Plan is announced, and a $2 million municipal bond issue is approved by the voters to begin implementation of the Plan

     
       
     
1965  

Charles Center-Inner Harbor Management, Inc. (CC-IH) enters into a non-profit contract with the City to manage the Charles Center and Inner Harbor developments

     
       
     
1968  

The U.S. Fidelity and Guaranty Corporation makes the first commitment for a major corporate headquarters in the Inner Harbor area.

The Federal Design Concept Team recommends removal of the Interstate Expressway from the mouth of the Inner Harbor

     
       
       
1969  

The USF Constellation is moved to Pier One in the Inner Harbor as the first attraction in the "Playground for Baltimoreans"

The Inner Harbor Campus of the Community College of Baltimore is announced

     
       
     
1970  

The first City Fair is held in Charles Center

Decision is announced to develop the new Federal Reserve office building in Inner  Harbor Project One

     
       
     
1971  

Construction contracts are awarded for the Inner Harbor bulkhead, the Public Wharf and Constellation Dock

City Council approves Urban Renewal Plan for the Inner Harbor West project

Development agreement is signed for the IBM Building on Pratt Street overlooking the Inner Harbor

     
         
     
1972  

William Donald Schaefer becomes Mayor

Construction of the World Trade Center is approved by the State Board of Public Works

     
       
       
1974  

Construction contract awarded for the Inner Harbor Promenade

     
       
     
1975  

The Otterbein Homesteading Program is announced for the sale of $1 dilapidated houses to be restored

Construction contract is negotiated by CC-IH for the first Pride of Baltimore

     
         
        PHASE THREE — BUILDING AN INTERNATIONAL TOURIST DESTINATION
       
     
1976  

Visit of the Tall Ships to commemorate the U.S. Bicentennial: eight ships tie up in the Inner Harbor and hold open house for the public: hundreds of thousands of people come

Consultants advise that Baltimore can create a tourist destination by building major attractions

$35 million State bond issue is approved for the Baltimore Convention Center

Opening of the new Mechanic Theater in Charles Center

     
       
     
1977  

The agreement to develop the Hyatt Regency Baltimore Hotel is announced

The Rouse Company announces its proposal to build Harborplace

     
       
       
1978  

Referendum to block the development of Harborplace is defeated by the voters

     
       
     
1979  

Construction is started on housing for the elderly in the Inner Harbor West Project

The Baltimore Convention Center opens with the Mayor's Ball

     
       
     
1980  

Harborplace is opened on July 4 with a gala celebration

     
       
     
1981  

The National Aquarium in Baltimore is opened

James Rouse is featured on he cover of Time magazine

The Hyatt Regency Batlimore Hotel is opened, becomes the most successful hotel in the Hyatt chain

The Performing Arts Music Tent is opened on Pier 6
     
       
     
1982  

I-395 connection is opened from downtown to the I-95 Interstate Expressway System

     
     
1983  

Charles Center subway station is opened

     
     
1984  

Plans are announced for 20 more new and/or recycled public or private development projects in the Inner Harbor

The Charles Center-Inner Harbor program receives an Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects as "one of the supreme achievements of large-scale urban design and development in U.S. history."

     
     
1985  

The Enterprise Development Company signs contract to advise and assist Sydney, Australia, in following the Inner Harbor model to redevelop its Darling Harbour area

     
         
        PHASE FOUR — THE INNER HARBOR CONTINUES TO EXPAND ITS AREA AND INFLUENCE
         
       

For further information about the influence of Baltimore's waterfront development on other port cities, see "Model for the World"